Welcome to the Content Marketing Revolution

Today’s post is courtesy of Edelman Digital and though the main focus of the piece is content marketing on social media (meaning it should fall under Social Media Wednesdays), it is important to view this new way of content marketing as a PR Tip necessary in order to adapt to the dynamic changes taking place in the world of public relations.

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Posted by 

Edelman Digital, Melbourne

Follow on Twitter @trevoryoung

While corporate gets hung up on the tactical aspects of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, the real action is bubbling beneath the surface. For many it’s not as sexy as the social technology platforms we hear about and see in the media every day but it’s equally powerful. Indeed, it’s the ‘secret sauce’ – the fuel that keeps the social web cranking along at breakneck speed.

I’m talking about content and how it can be used to keep your brand connected to the people who matter most to your business, cause or issue – how it can help organisations to:

  • Attract Attention
  • Gain respect
  • Build trust

… with longer-term goal of generating leads and ultimately growing sales revenue. (And let’s face it, which brands don’t want to tick those boxes?).

Emerging from Social Shadows

While we’re (finally) starting to take the notion of social media more seriously here in Australia, in the US the concept of ‘content marketing’ has emerged from the social shadows and is set to explode.

The creation, sharing (and in some instances, curation) of content is becoming a cornerstone marketing activity for many major brands and fast-growth companies.

Strategic Intent

Content can include everything from videos, podcasts, e-books, white papers and case studies through to blog posts, infographics, webinars, microblogging (Twitter), online news releases, mobile phone apps and interactive newsrooms. Used effectively and with strategic intent, content marketing is a powerful means of reaching and engaging with current and potential customers, media and other influencers.

The irony, however, is that despite its huge growth, content marketing is not exactly new. Videos, hard-copy newsletters and custom-published magazines – all corporate communication tools that have been around for years – can be considered content.

Why the sudden interest in content as a cornerstone marketing strategy?

Blame (or more importantly, thank!) the emergence of the social web.

Distribution Channels

Today, any person, company or organisation can establish its own online TV show (vodcast), radio station (podcast) or web-based magazine (blog), while social networking tools such as LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and Facebook serve as effective and powerful two-way content distribution channels.

Think about it for a moment. Let the concept percolate a bit – swill it around in your mind.

At the risk of repeating myself, we can now communicate directly with the people who matter most to the success of our business – and we can do it with a degree of scale and intensity of connection we’ve not been able to do before. I might also add: cost-effectively and in real-time.

This presents massive opportunities for companies and organisations to bypass the traditional ‘gatekeepers’ – journalists and editors – and engage directly with their constituents.

Empathy and Respect

But this opportunity comes with a caveat – several, actually.

Content marketing is not a sales pitch. Have empathy for your audience. Treat them with respect.

Create compelling content that’s interesting, relevant and worthwhile to your audience: it’s about them, not you.

Solve problems experienced by your audience (add value); tap into the experts in your company (hidden assets); provide credible information (without selling); and shine the spotlight on your customers (take a back seat).

Content marketing can be a powerful strategy. Get involved, but use it cleverly and respectfully … and reap the benefits!

Image credit: Rafael Peñaloza

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What PR Courses Actually Need To Teach PR Undergraduates

Ed Zitron PROn today’s Monday PR Tips we have Ed Zitron, the founder of EZ-PR, a PR and Media Relations company based in New York City and Raleigh, North Carolina. He is also of the author of “This Is How You Pitch: How To Kick Ass In Your First Years of PR,” an Amazon bestseller in the PR category. He has worked with companies large and small, including Target and The Nature Publishing Group, as well as smaller startups and tech figureheads.

He was featured in PR in Your Pajamas and discussed the information gap between the PR taught in institutions of higher learning and what graduates need to know and actually experience in the industry.

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In 2005, I took a public relations course at a major state university – PR 101 – and remember the lesson plans clearly:

  • the history of PR
  • writing a “communications brief”
  • writing a press release
  • press conferences

Eventually, I moved on to further classes. They mostly covered press conferences and “advance communications,” a vague summary of different techniques that you might want to use in general PR… activities.

At no point did the courses actually address the media.

This was nearly a full year before Twitter would launch. Facebook wasn’t available outside of colleges. Jon Gruber had been writing for 3 years, and TechCrunch would launch not too long after. Thus we completely missed a chunk of the “social” aspect that makes up the new world of PR, or indeed the importance of bloggers.

Regardless, reading over current PR courses and many textbooks used in courses, it’s clear PR undergrads are being taught to do things that are not part of most PR people’s days. Yes, it’s very exciting to be taught that you’ll be handling big campaigns, or “handling webinars,” or how important AP Style is (which in the grand scheme of things is mostly irrelevant), or how to handle a press conference — one of the most irrelevant skills that you’ll find before a career in high-end corporate PR.

While it may not be deliberate, this is a horrible misrepresentation of the industry as a whole and is leading students down a dark, dark path. The reason behind the failure at the educational level is simple: Many of these teachers are either not active practitioners, or others are fundamentally not good at major parts of the current world of PR. It’s easy to become obsolete if you’re teaching but not practicing.

After some research, I’ve come up with what I believe are the core elements that need to be applied to just about every PR curriculum. They are:

The Realities of PR

PR is no longer about event management. It is not press conferences. It is not glitz and glamor and fancy parties. At least not initially. The world of PR they are entering is cold, over-staffed, over-worked drudgery. It is mostly behind a computer, and the salaries are lower than ever. It’s potentially immensely lucrative if you become well-connected. It does not start that way.

These core lessons need to be ingested immediately:

  • The best way to network is to be yourself. It is not to have a personal brand or “love the media.” It’s about being an interesting human being.
  • Read a lot more. Reading and knowing the news and the world around you is more valuable than being popular on Facebook or loving to party.
  • PR is not flashy, and you will probably not deal with flashy clients for a long time. Many PR agencies sell themselves as working on huge clients like P&G, Samsung, and Gucci. This is not what most will do initially. They will probably work in small tech firms or with restaurants or with non-profits – immensely demanding clients that will not educate them.
  • The first years of PR will be a lot of document-writing, package-stuffing and document work. This fact is for some reason completely hidden from new PR professionals.

Media Relations

Many PR professionals on many blogs say media relations isn’t the core of PR. It isn’t a thing that you “have” to do. I’m sorry, but it is. It always will be, especially for new PR people.

The core elements of media relations are:

  • Researching an outlet and a reporter. This should focus on how to read properly, how to understand and have a rapport with a reporter, and how to understand the structure of each news outlet.
  • Writing a pitch. This should be taught in such a way as to write a pitch that will work to get a response and what you want, under 150 words. This is a very specific skill that is almost totally diametric to how Public Relations courses are taught.
  • The difference between a blogger, a reporter and a producer. The first two parts are somewhat blurred these days – a reporter can blog at a newspaper and a blogger can be called a reporter. However these people are fundamentally different and need to be approached in different ways, especially TV and radio producers.
  • What things are truly newsworthy, and how to actually get reporters to care about them. If a teacher can’t teach this, and teach the reality that many stories are kind of boring, they are not worth their salt.
  • How to actually talk to a person whom you want to write a story. This is really about not talking to them about anything and getting to know what they want to hear about. Once you know that, you can send it to them. Or not, when you don’t have it.

The Reality of Social Media

Social media is taught in a critically dishonest manner by the education system. It’s really exciting to talk about social media in a way that suggests it’s the new golden goose — that a single tweet can spread your news faster than anything else, and that, you too, could have thousands or millions of followers who will share your news in the most passive and useful manner.

Social media classes need to teach:

  • How to use Twitter or Facebook or Instagram in a real sense. You should not just be tweeting out endless praise for your company, or how great you are. You should be an honest company or an honest person.
  • You don’t need always need Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook. There is no actual need to have every company with a social presence. Conversely, for many brick and mortar businesses, such as Angie’s List and Houzz for contractors and service businesses, some social media platforms are incredibly important.
  • How a real social media following is built through trust and a reason to actually care. If a company or a restaurant or anyone is just spilling out fatuous nonsense about their lives or how great they are, very few people are going to care.
  • That a social media calendar or strategy can be a waste of time. Mapping out a bunch of tweets or Facebook updates or “special days” for many companies isn’t necessary unless they have an active Facebook or Twitter following.

This is by no means an exhaustive list of everything they should know, but the core problem with PR education is that a 101 class should give the basics — the groundwork from which a real PR professional should theoretically grow. In the same way that pre-med and med schools exist to give the factual and theoretical ideas that will be used in the actual workplace, PR courses need to provide the theoretical foundation and background knowledge today’s PR professionals will need in their day-to-day work.

10 Career Facts You’ll Learn After University

With the increasing number of graduates churned out by our universities and colleges and even fewer employment opportunities, campus students should note the below 10 career facts to help broaden their outlook on the Kenyan employment landscape and life after campus.

Today’s article is courtesy of Money Careers and written by Lindsay Olson originally titled ‘10 Career Facts You’ll Learn After College‘.

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Lindsay Olson

Our career paths seem so cut and dry when we’re children. When asked what we want to be when we grow up, our responses are simple: teacher, firefighter, doctor. But as we grow up and head to college, we’re exposed to all sorts of other career options in fields we never have had exposure to in a direct way. While we work to earn degrees in fields we’re interested in pursuing, we’re still left a bit unprepared for the corporate world upon graduation.

Here are 10 facts your college degree didn’t prepare you for when graduating:

1. You’re not limited to jobs in the field you got your degree in. If you have a degree in journalism, you might assume that means your only option is becoming a journalist. But armed with great communications skills, you could also qualify for jobs in PR, marketing, or business administration. It’s all how you play your cards and where you get your experience.

2. Your degree isn’t always that important to employers. Despite what you’d like to believe, many employers won’t care where you went to school, or even what you earned your degree in. They’ll focus instead on your skills: whether or not you seem trainable enough for the job you’ve applied for. They’ll also look at experience. You’ll have the hardest time in regards to experience just out of college, as you won’t yet have much detail on your resume. Focus on getting internships and volunteer positions to round out the experience employers will be looking for.

3. Some employers won’t even require you to have a degree. This can be an eye-opener to anyone who’s spent four-plus years earning a degree, but again, employers look for experience and trainability. And while having a college degree does display your ability to be taught, it’s not the only path to a professional career.

4. There are jobs you’ve never even heard of in your field. Like many college grads, you probably received a brochure listing all the amazing careers you could consider in your field. But there are often many more beyond that list. If you have a degree in English, you’ve likely already considered the obvious option of teaching or writing, but publishing, proofreading, speech-writing, or becoming a paralegal might not have crossed your mind.

5. Grades don’t matter. It is highly unlikely an employer will ask for your transcript, at least not to check out your grades. That’s not to dissuade current college students from trying their hardest, but the fact is: employers don’t care about grades.

6. College is about networking. Make the most out of your alumni network and see what opportunities there are for you professionally. Speak to professors in your department about what they’d recommend for you career-wise.

7. Some degrees pay better than others. And liberal arts degrees aren’t at the top of the list. Biomedical engineering, math, and science, however, are. Something to consider when planning the massive amounts of money you’ll make … with your philosophy degree.

8. College does not prepare you for a job. Nothing but job experience can do that. And, of course, you need job experience to get a job. It’s a vicious cycle to which you’ve got to find your own solution.

9. Employers don’t want to train you to do a job. That’s why they’re more likely to hire people not fresh out of college. Do yourself a favor and take on an internship or two during college so that you’ve already gone through the experience of being in a work environment and having some experiences to help guide you. This will make you more hireable after graduation.

10. It’s okay to change your mind. Many graduates start working in their field of choice only to find out it wasn’t what they expected when they were cracking the books on the subject. It’s okay (see no. 1). You don’t necessarily need to start over and get another degree; just open your mind to other career options your degree might make you eligible for in the future.

Valentine’s Day Ideas

Though Valentine’s Day is associated with couples, there is much more that can be done to spread the love that runs rampant on this day. Attributed to St. Valentine, February the 14th is the day to celebrate love and not just with our better halves but with those around us, including strangers.

Organizations can also show love in big or small ways through generous or caring acts toward their customers. It can be as simply as handing customers roses as they walk in through the door. Even for the most anti-Valentine’s person (because lets admit it, they exist), this gesture will bring a smile.

Wondering what else you can do before the day ends to show your love?

Volunteer

There is no shortage of places where you can lend a hand. A children’s home, a hospital, your local primary school, a campaign targeting the needy in the community, a charity walk or event, a fundraising for a good cause- there is always a need around you desiring to be met.

Fundraising

Many women will be protective over this next suggestion.

Instead of spending a great amount of money on pricey dinners and getaways, you could support Valentine themed fundraisers targeted to benefit local nonprofits. You could even host a small event of your own and get your friends to donate money or other materials to take to a charity of your choice. This does put smiles on a lot more people’s faces by the time the clock strikes midnight.

Send love letters 

Not just to your sweetheart but to people and organizations that are making a difference in the world. It is an opportune time (apart from New Year’s) to celebrate and appreciate work done by world and community changers. If you are feeling extra generous, slip in a gift card in the envelope as well.

Give to the needy

This can be done in two ways. Choose to buy gifts from entities that donate profits to charity organizations i.e. some arts and crafts shops or online stores. This way you kill two birds with one stone. The other alternatives is making homemade cards or goodies (you can buy these) and delivering them to the sick, their caregivers and literally anyone else who is likely to be forgotten on this Love Day. Donate what you do not use to charity as well, as long as they are in relatively good condition.

Every day people

These are the people that make your life convenient in every single way. It could be your help, gardener, the newspaper vendor or even your favourite attendant at your go-to coffee shop. You don’t have to give roses or gifts but a smile, thank you and/or a tip makes all the difference.

Small random acts of kindness

Did you know that from 10 to 17th of February is Random Acts of Kindness Week? There are endless acts of kindness you could do for others. You can pay fare for a stranger, buy a beggar lunch or do something you usually don’t do free of charge.

 

Let us know what you go up to this Valentine’s Day and Random Acts of Kindness Week. Happy Valentine’s from Glass House PR!